Quantum Computing for Finance

Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

In this first episode of our “Quantum in Finance” series hosts Esperanza and Anahita will be speaking with Román Orús and Enrique Lizaso Olmos about the work of Multiverse Computing with companies from the financial industry which want to gain an edge with quantum computing.

Webinar link: https://my.demio.com/ref/lCURad3NsjLcFyyR

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, June 10, 2021 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Circuit Model of Quantum Computing as if it Occurred in an Escape Room Game

Saturday, July 24, 2021 - 11:00am to 1:00pm

Title: Explaining Circuit Model of Quantum Computing as if it Occurred in an Escape Room GameAbstract:The talk is on teaching the circuit model of quantum computing. It presents a method to explain algorithms on n qubits in n-dimensional space, thus not in 2^n-dimensional space. It is particularly interesting for n=3. Here algorithms can be illustrated using an ordinary cube (which everybody can easily imagine) and not using the 8-dimensional space (which is much harder to imagine).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, August 12, 2021 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, September 9, 2021 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 11:30am to 12:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 11:30am to 12:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 11:30am to 12:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 11:30am to 12:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, March 10, 2022 - 11:30am to 12:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, April 14, 2022 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).

Topological Quantum Computing : Principles and Possibilities

Thursday, May 12, 2022 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

A topological quantum computer is a theoretical quantum computer proposed by Russian-American physicist Alexei Kitaev in 1997. It employs two-dimensional quasiparticles called anyons, whose world lines pass around one another to form braids in a three-dimensional spacetime (i.e., one temporal plus two spatial dimensions).